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Formerly

Ophthalmology for Animals, Monterey

OFA Monterey is now Veterinary Eye Clinic of Monterey Bay. Our staff and location are the same at Ryan Ranch. Come see us.

We work with your primary veterinarian to provide specialized eye care for your pet.

Conditions We Treat

There are occasions when your veterinarian might suggest a referral to an eye specialist to better meet your pet’s needs. Veterinary specialists complete additional intensive training to become experts in their field. Dr. Elizabeth Curto is a specialist in Veterinary Ophthalmology and is highly trained and experienced to diagnose and treat all conditions affecting the eyes of animals. At VECMB, we work along with your primary veterinarian as a team to provide advanced and complete care for your pet. Below are just a few of the eye conditions we routinely treat.

Monterey eye doctor for dogs, cats, horses
Veterinary Eye Clinic of Monterey Bay - Staff Photo

We Are VECMB

We strive for a safe, comfortable, stress-free and professional environment for you and your pet. The well-being of our patients and clients is our top priority. We understand that illness creates worry and uncertainty. Our skilled and compassionate nursing staff and doctors are here to help!

Our pets are family.  They give us meaning and comfort, fill our lives with love and laughter, and feed our souls. We are committed to enhancing the lives of our patients by relieving pain, minimizing stress, restoring and maintaining vision, and providing enduring comfort.

We utilize a collaborative approach working along with your primary veterinarian for complete, well-rounded care. We offer advanced, evidence-based specialty ophthalmology services with state-of-the-art techniques and equipment.

Elizabeth Curto, DVM

Diplomate of the American College
of Veterinary Ophthalmologists

Dr. Elizabeth Curto received her Bachelor of Science in Biology with Honors from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University and earned her Doctorate in Veterinary Medicine from the University of California, Davis.  Following an internship in Littleton, Colorado and a research fellowship at the Ohio State University, she completed her residency in Comparative Ophthalmology at North Carolina State University and became a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.  Dr. Curto is passionate about helping large and small animal patients of all species.

Elizabeth Curto, DVM
Dr. Rachel Rowen

Rachel Rowen, DVM

Ophthalmology Resident

Sue

Sue

Registered Veterinary
Technician

Brooke

Brooke

Registered Veterinary
Technician

Reyna

Reyna

Registered Veterinary
Technician

Haylie

Haylie

Reception

Jenn

Jenn

Reception

Why utilize a veterinary specialist?

Just as in human medicine, veterinary medical specialists are a valuable resource in treating your pet. Your general practice veterinarian has excellent training in veterinary medicine and acts as a family practice physician to your pet. But just as with human medicine, there are occasions when your veterinarian might want assistance or suggest a referral to a specialist to better meet your pet’s needs. Specialists should be board certified by the appropriate national agency and are available in ophthalmology, internal medicine, surgery, pathology, oncology, radiology, cardiology, dermatology, and others. You should not feel shy about asking your general practice veterinarian for a referral to a specialist if you feel one might be helpful. Your veterinarian and the veterinary specialist will work together as a team to treat your pet.

What is a veterinary specialist in ophthalmology?

A specialist in veterinary ophthalmology has completed all phases of training through an approved American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO) residency and passed all written and practical examinations. After obtaining an undergraduate degree, a 4-year doctorate in veterinary medicine is completed. This is followed by a 1-year clinical rotating internship or at least 2 years of general practice work. A 3- or 4-year residency program in veterinary ophthalmology is then followed by a demanding specialty examination including both written and practical portions. Knowledge and skill gained through rigorous advanced training allow a specialist in veterinary ophthalmology to diagnose and treat eye disease in animals. Once training is complete and exams are passed, a specialist is referred to as a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists. A veterinary specialist is required to maintain their skills through annual continuing education. You may find more information about veterinary ophthalmology at www.ACVO.org.

Is my pet too old for anesthesia?

Age is only one factor when evaluating an animal for anesthesia. Quality of anesthesia is a much more important factor to consider than age. However, age-related problems such as renal or heart problems are weighed heavily into the equation. Pre-operative screening should detect these patients. Appropriate drugs, cardiovascular support and very close monitoring with state-of-the-art equipment are necessary for a successful anesthetic event. At Veterinary Eye Clinic, many of our patients are geriatric and we are prepared to administer and monitor anesthesia safely to older patients.

Do you offer appointments for horses?

Yes! Dr. Curto is experienced in diagnosing and managing equine ocular diseases. Our office works closely with Steinbeck Country Equine Clinic and local equine veterinarians to provide comprehensive ophthalmic services. Because equine cases can be particularly complex, they often require a team effort along with your regular veterinarian. Equine examinations should be scheduled through your veterinarian when possible.

Are E-collars necessary?

Yes, the use of e-collars is often necessary to aid in the healing process of your pet’s ophthalmic problem. We understand that they are not always easy for you or your pet, but please remember that the e-collar is safeguarding the eyes and improves the chances of a successful outcome. It often takes a day or two for your pet to adjust to the collar, but they will in time.

If your pet won’t eat or drink you can try elevating the food and water bowls with a phone book, box or large overturned bowl. If your pet’s ears smell or you suspect an ear infection you may need to trim hair around the ears and keep the inside of the collar more dry. If your pet is head-shaking or the signs persist, please bring your pet in to see your veterinarian. Head shaking can be detrimental to any corneal or intraocular surgery. Animals occasionally will not urinate or defecate while wearing a collar. Just be patient. Give your pet 24-48 hours after surgery as they may be “empty” due to pre-anesthetic fasting or may be constipated due to certain perioperative medications. You can try adding canned pumpkin to the food and take your pet for frequent walks. If constipation persists, please call us.

If your pet won’t walk or move while wearing the e-collar, you can try offering treats to lure them over to you. Keep encouraging them and over time, your pet will get used to the e-collar.

Recovery visors and masks offered by Protective Pet Solutions can be helpful to protect the eyes of pets that struggle with the e-collar, especially for larger breeds.  These items can be purchased directly from their website: www.protectivepetsolutions.com.

Do I need a referral from my veterinarian?

Veterinary Eye Clinic is a specialty practice. We work closely with referring veterinarians to help manage ophthalmic cases. We do not require, however, that you see your regular veterinarian prior to scheduling an appointment with us. 

Contact Us

If you are a new patient, please CLICK HERE to complete our New Patient Form prior to your first appointment.

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